Obama commutes NM man serving on marijuana charges

A Las Cruces man behind bars for marijuana possession is among the 46 people whose prison sentences President Obama commuted today. In 2004, John M. Wyatt was convicted with possessing and attempting to distribute more than 220 pounds of marijuana in southern Illinois. His sentence netted him nearly 22 years in prison plus an extra eight years on supervised release. Wyatt, 54, is serving his sentence at a low security Federal Correctional Institution in La Tuna, Texas. He was set to be released in November 2021 until Obama’s commute.

NM swims against criminal justice reform tide

The aftermath of a heinous crime that saw a career criminal kill a Rio Rancho police officer is sparking talk of tougher crime laws. Next week, state lawmakers in the interim Courts, Corrections & Justice Committee will hear testimony on a bill to add crimes to New Mexico’s existing “three strikes” law, which assigns mandatory life in prison sentences to convicts of three violent crimes. Yet the local legislative doubling down on “tough on crime” laws—two Republican state representatives are proposing changes that would tighten New Mexico’s three strikes law—comes at a time with strong national momentum in the opposite direction. And it’s Republicans with national ambitions that, in many cases, have been making headlines for this. “Former [Texas] Gov. Rick Perry is going around the country bragging that he closed three prisons,” said state Rep. Antonio “Moe” Maestas, D-Albuquerque, who supports criminal justice reform.

Martinez vetoes two bills, including reduction of probation for good behavior

Gov. Susana Martinez vetoed two pieces of legislation but signed 24 more on Tuesday as the deadline to make a decision nears. Martinez vetoed legislation that would reduce time on probation for those with good behavior. The legislation passed both chambers unanimously. The bill’s sponsor, Rep. Antonio “Moe” Maestas, D-Albuquerque, told New Mexico Political Report last week he hoped Martinez would sign the legislation, part of the criminal justice reform slate. “The point is to alleviate the stress of the probation department,” Maestas said at the time.

Two criminal justice reform bills await action by Gov

A week and a half after the end of the 2015 Legislative Session in New Mexico, two lawmakers are waiting to see the fate of two bipartisan bills aimed at reforming criminal justice laws. The bills passed the legislature and are now awaiting action from Gov. Susana Martinez. Sen. Lisa Torraco, R-Albuquerque, and Rep. Antonio “Moe” Maestas, D-Albuquerque, each sponsored bills endorsed by the interim Criminal Justice Reform Subcommittee. The two lawmakers also co-chaired the committee. Torraco sponsored SB 358, which would allow inmates convicted of nonviolent offenses to enter into a halfway house during the last year of incarceration.

Crossing the aisle in the name of reform

Wrapping up its first full year, the Criminal Justice Reform Subcommittee has approved legislation to be introduced for the 2015 session. The legislative subcommittee made up of state senators and representatives was put together with the intention of exploring changes to New Mexico’s criminal codes. This year, there are eight proposed bills that are listed as endorsed by the committee. The group is co-chaired by Sen. Lisa Torraco, R-Albuquerque, and Rep. Antonio “Moe” Maestas, D-Albuquerque. Torraco said the committee only endorsed legislation that every member agreed with.