We may not know if Trump’s foreign business deals violate the Constitution

The question of whether President-elect Donald Trump will run afoul of federal conflict-of-interest rules or the Constitution because of his extensive foreign investments has been the subject of intense scrutiny among legal and ethics scholars. Legally, his foreign licensing deals could violate the Constitution. An example: During his presidential run, Trump’s name was used to market a never-finished luxury hotel in Azerbaijan, built by the billionaire son of the country’s transportation minister. The deal earned Trump more than $2.8 million between January 2014 and May 2016, according to financial-disclosure filings he filed as a candidate. (See his 2015 and 2016 reports here.)

This story originally appeared on the ProPublica website and is republished through a Creative Commons license.

Poll: Clinton leads Trump narrowly in NM, Johnson polling well

A new poll shows Hillary Clinton has a narrow lead over Donald Trump in New Mexico in the race for president—and that Libertarian Party nominee Gary Johnson has an impressive showing. The poll, conducted by Research and Polling, Inc. for the Albuquerque Journal, shows Democratic nominee Clinton holds a 35 percent to 31 percent lead over Republican nominee Trump among likely voters in New Mexico. Johnson, a former governor of New Mexico, brings in 24 percent. This appears to be the best showing by Johnson in any state poll so far. Green Party nominee Jill Stein, meanwhile, gets the support of just two percent of likely voters.

Johnson gets a New Mexico welcome at ABQ rally

Former New Mexico Gov. Gary Johnson stopped on his way into a rally at the Albuquerque Convention Center to see the workings of a lowrider car with hydraulics Saturday afternoon. After he watched with awe, the most logical thing happened—the presidential candidate sat in the car as the front end jumped seven feet off the ground and lurched forward. The surrounding crowd cheered as Johnson pressed against the ceiling of the car. https://twitter.com/Anjreu/status/767070094526590976

Later, as he walked into a press conference, Johnson told NM Political Report he enjoyed himself but was still feeling the effects. “My teeth are still chattering,” Johnson said.

Obama, Bush call for unity at Dallas memorial

DALLAS — Steps away from pictures of the five officers killed last week by a lone gunman, President Barack Obama, former President George W. Bush and Dallas Mayor Mike Rawlings said Tuesday the best way to honor their lives is for Americans to open their hearts to one another and unite. “With an open heart, we can worry less about which side has been wronged and worry more about joining sides to do what is right,” Obama said at an interfaith service honoring Brent Thompson, Patrick Zamarripa, Michael Krol, Michael Smith and Lorne Ahrens. Obama, Bush and local leaders addressed a sea of black suits, dresses and uniforms at the Meyerson Symphony Center, where an estimated 2,500 people attended the service. Throughout the dimly lit room, attendees sported yellow and blue sashes representing the Dallas community and its first responders, respectively. The stage for the memorial was adorned with photos of the five fallen officers, as well as an array of flags representing North Texas cities that were among the first to rally for Dallas on Thursday. The five officers died when Micah Xavier Johnson, 25, opened fire on police Thursday night, striking 10 Dallas Police Department officers and one from the Dallas Area Rapid Transit Authority. The shooting came at the end of a peaceful protest by hundreds against the two recent police killings of black men Alton Sterling in Louisiana and Philando Castile in Minnesota.

Bill Clinton makes Santa Fe stop

SANTA FE — Bill Clinton made a surprise visit to Tia Sofia’s in Santa Fe and spoke to many of the patrons and workers. Clinton made the appearance as part of a quick campaign trip to New Mexico on behalf of his wife, Hillary Clinton. Most of Bill Clinton’s time was spent at just one table, where he debated a Bernie Sanders supporter over laws that he signed into law during his term as president. Related: Bill Clinton takes Hillary Clinton campaign to The Range

The Sanders supporter, who only identified himself as Josh, did not agree with welfare reform and the economy. He also said that deregulation that he said hurt working Americans.

Martinez will attend Trump’s RNC

Gov. Susana Martinez is still quiet on if she will support presumptive Republican nominee Donald Trump, but she will attend the convention dedicated to him this summer. Martinez said, as the head of the Republican Governor’s Association, she would attend this year’s Republican National Convention in Cleveland. She was answering a question from an Associated Press reporter on Monday. The video is available at the bottom of this post. “It is my responsibility to also be part of the Republican convention,” she said.

Bush 41, 43 have no plans to endorse Trump

For the first time since his own presidency, George H.W. Bush is planning to stay silent in the race for the Oval Office — and the younger former president Bush plans to stay silent as well. Bush 41, who enthusiastically endorsed every Republican nominee for the last five election cycles, will stay out of the campaign process this time. He does not have plans to endorse presumptive GOP nominee Donald Trump, spokesman Jim McGrath told The Texas Tribune. “At age 91, President Bush is retired from politics,” McGrath wrote in an email Wednesday. “He came out of retirement to do a few things for Jeb, but those were the exceptions that proved the rule.” His son Jeb Bush dropped out of the GOP presidential race in February.

Senate passes NCLB overhaul with NM Senators’ support

Both New Mexico senators voted in favor of a No Child Left Behind replacement Wednesday, following unanimous support last week on the same bill from the state’s Congressional delegation. Democrats and teachers unions have widely praised the Every Student Succeeds Act for taking away federal oversight of accountability from standardized tests. Under No Child Left Behind, the federal government could withhold money from schools that scored low on the Adequate Yearly Progress reports, which were made from standardized test scores. The new bill, which cleared the House of Representatives last week, leaves this type of accountability measures to the states. “It gives states the decision on high stakes testing, which unfortunately in our state the governor wants,” Albuquerque Teachers Federation President Ellen Bernstein said in an interview.