Budget tops list of unfinished business

New Mexico legislators start their 60-day session Tuesday with plenty of unfinished business, including closing a projected budget deficit of about $67 million. But any hope that the passing of a rancorous election year and the ongoing budget crisis would inspire bipartisan compromise already seems to have evaporated. Instead, Republican Gov. Susana Martinez and top […]

Budget tops list of unfinished business

New Mexico legislators start their 60-day session Tuesday with plenty of unfinished business, including closing a projected budget deficit of about $67 million.

But any hope that the passing of a rancorous election year and the ongoing budget crisis would inspire bipartisan compromise already seems to have evaporated.

Instead, Republican Gov. Susana Martinez and top lawmakers have staked out positions that almost guarantee a clash over taxes and spending. In addition, more budget cuts are likely, no matter the outcome.

Martinez proposed easing the projected deficit by requiring public employees to pay for a bigger share toward their pensions. The governor’s budget chief says the move would save the state about $100 million each year and avoid layoffs and furloughs. Labor unions counter that the proposal amounts to a pay cut for tens of thousands of families.




The governor also has suggested taking $125 million from the savings accounts of public school districts. While the state Senate approved siphoning off a smaller amount during the fall special session intended to address the very budget problems lawmakers are facing yet again, members of the House of Representatives blocked the move. School districts had staunchly opposed the idea of losing their emergency accounts.

The governor said the savings amounted to a “slush fund” for school district bureaucracy and pointed out that the state has tapped the reserves before during tight times. But administrators and teachers unions say the reserves provide financial stability for public schools.

Speaking to reporters in Albuquerque one recent day, Martinez was quick to blame the deficit on legislators.

“Difficult decisions were avoided during an election year,” she said.

The governor signed a $6.2 billion budget last February that cut spending by 2 percent for most state agencies, and it made even larger reductions for colleges and universities. With the decline of oil and gas prices, as well as the collapse of drilling operations around the state, driving down state revenues, the budget was the leanest since 2009.

The state’s financial situation only worsened as oil prices continued to slide. Legislators returned to the Capitol at the end of September to pay off a deficit from the previous year totaling more than $200 million by making more cuts.

Even so, those reductions did not solve the financial crisis, prompting some Democrats to say tax increases also would have to be considered. But Martinez repeated her opposition to raising taxes, even if some measures have bipartisan support.

Leading legislators fired back, accusing the Republican governor of placing extra burdens on workers and students.

“We can’t cut our way out of this recession,” said Sen. Howie Morales, D-Silver City. He described the governor’s pension proposal as “inhumane.”

The Legislative Finance Committee recommended closing the budget deficit in part with a smaller raid on school district reserves, delaying funding for public works projects and diverting money from an existing cigarette tax earmarked to cover the cost of a university building that is nearly paid off.

For the budget year that begins in July, both the finance committee and governor proposed lean budgets that would cut funding for many state agencies and universities.

The price of oil is rising, buoying hopes for the state’s revenues, but New Mexico’s government is still expected to bring in close to $100 million less than it did this year, according to the Legislative Finance Committee.

Both budgets would increase funding for the Corrections Department and leave largely untouched the overall budgets of the Children, Youth and Families Department and the Department of Cultural Affairs.

The Legislative Finance Committee’s budget would total $6.05 billion and boost funding for the state’s court system as well as the Law Offices of the Public Defender. Both arms of government had requested bigger increases in funding. The state public defender even declined to take new clients in Hobbs because defense attorneys were already overloaded with cases. The governor’s budget, totaling about $6.09 billion, would leave funding for the agency flat.

But the committee’s budget would cut funding for education by about $27.4 million, or eight-tenths of a percent. Meanwhile, the governor touted her budget because it would not siphon money from the stream of funding the state provides to school districts. And the committee’s budget relies on lawmakers approving a tax on health care services as well as finding an additional $123 million in new taxes or additional cuts.

A spokesman for the governor blasted the committee’s proposed budget.

“The governor believes it’s up to state government to tighten its own belt — not our hardworking families,” Mike Lonergan said in an email. “Her plan doesn’t raise taxes and it protects classroom spending, economic development efforts and public safety.”

The criticism from Martinez’s camp casts doubt on the prospects for bipartisan agreement on tax reform. Legislators from both parties have voiced support in recent months for at least a few new revenue measures. One idea is collecting gross receipts tax from online retailers such as Amazon. Republicans have argued the move would support hometown businesses competing with major corporations. But Martinez said she would not sign the bill if it’s approved, signaling that more cutbacks are likely.

Contact Andrew Oxford at 505-986-3093 or [email protected]. Follow him on Twitter @andrewboxford.

 

We're ad free

That means that we rely on support from readers like you. Help us keep reporting on the most important New Mexico Stories by donating today.

Related

Both Republicans and Democrats skeptical of guv’s proposals for special session

Both Republicans and Democrats skeptical of guv’s proposals for special session

A representative from Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham’s office outlined on Thursday the bills the governor’s office will back during the upcoming special session, but…
Senators throw support to embattled Ivey-Soto

Senators throw support to embattled Ivey-Soto

By Justin Horwath, New Mexico In Dept Sen. Daniel Ivey-Soto is running for a fourth term despite the state Democratic Party’s decision to censure…
AG announces legislative priorities for upcoming special session

AG announces legislative priorities for upcoming special session

Attorney General Raúl Torrez announced on Thursday his legislative priorities for July’s special legislative session, including the creation of a crime victim’s unit to…
LANL plans to release highly radioactive tritium to prevent explosions. Will it just release danger in the air?

LANL plans to release highly radioactive tritium to prevent explosions. Will it just release danger in the air?

By Alicia Inez Guzmán, Searchlight New Mexico Last fall, the international community rose up in defense of the Pacific Ocean. Seafood and salt purveyors,…
Program administrator outlines how waitlisted community solar projects will be selected

Program administrator outlines how waitlisted community solar projects will be selected

The program administrator for New Mexico’s community solar program released guidance Thursday for waitlisted projects. The new guidelines follow a petition from several developers…
Community organizations propose providing naturalized immigrants with public lands passes

Community organizations propose providing naturalized immigrants with public lands passes

A group of advocates are asking the federal government to give naturalized citizens a one-year pass to the national parks. President Joe Biden’s signing…
Stansbury outlines funding secured for early childhood and youth services programs

Stansbury outlines funding secured for early childhood and youth services programs

U.S. Rep. Melanie Stansbury secured $8.3 million for childhood development and youth services in the 1st congressional district through federal community project funding. Stansbury,…
Amid new graduation requirements, what do high schoolers want to learn?

Amid new graduation requirements, what do high schoolers want to learn?

By Margaret O’Hara, The Santa Fe New Mexican The main things that bring Brayan Chavez to school every day: Seeing, talking to and engaging with…
Special ed teachers hope lawmakers OK pay raises, admin changes

Special ed teachers hope lawmakers OK pay raises, admin changes

By Margaret O’Hara, The Santa Fe New Mexican Brittany Behenna Griffith has a laundry list of adjectives to describe the ideal special education teacher:…
Heinrich questions FDA leadership on baby formula safety, mifepristone

Heinrich questions FDA leadership on baby formula safety, mifepristone

U.S. Food and Drug Administration Commissioner Dr. Robert Califf answered questions about the safety of human milk formula and mifepristone on Wednesday. Sen. Martin…
Health workers fear it’s profits before protection as CDC revisits airborne transmission

Health workers fear it’s profits before protection as CDC revisits airborne transmission

Amy Maxmen, KFF Health News Four years after hospitals in New York City overflowed with covid-19 patients, emergency physician Sonya Stokes remains shaken by…
Lujan Grisham, Biden admin announce $10 million in federal funds for tribes, pueblos

Lujan Grisham, Biden admin announce $10 million in federal funds for tribes, pueblos

Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham announced Friday $10 million in funding from the federal American Rescue Plan Act was awarded to six tribal nations and…
Abortion medication access remains after Supreme Court ruling

Abortion medication access remains after Supreme Court ruling

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled against the Texas-based Christian group trying to restrict access to abortion medication on Thursday. The case, FDA v. the…
How abortion care has changed since Dobbs 

How abortion care has changed since Dobbs 

In the month of March 2024 alone, 1,650 clinician-provided abortions took place in New Mexico, according to the reproductive research organization, the Guttmacher Institute.…
Many Democrats endorsed by reproductive rights group won primaries

Many Democrats endorsed by reproductive rights group won primaries

With nearly 53 percent of the precincts reporting as of 11 p.m. Tuesday, most of the legislative candidates endorsed by Planned Parenthood Votes New…
Abortion medication access remains after Supreme Court ruling

Abortion medication access remains after Supreme Court ruling

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled against the Texas-based Christian group trying to restrict access to abortion medication on Thursday. The case, FDA v. the…
How abortion care has changed since Dobbs 

How abortion care has changed since Dobbs 

In the month of March 2024 alone, 1,650 clinician-provided abortions took place in New Mexico, according to the reproductive research organization, the Guttmacher Institute.…
Senate Republicans block bill to ensure access to contraception

Senate Republicans block bill to ensure access to contraception

Senate Republicans blocked an effort to pass a bill to protect access to contraception this week. U.S. Sen. Martin Heinrich and Ben Ray Luján,…
Democrats announce spending on CD2 race

Democrats announce spending on CD2 race

The Democratic National Committee announced on Monday that it will spend $70,000 for organizing staff to aid U.S. Rep. Gabe Vasquez, the Democrat trying…
Handful of legislators lose primaries

Handful of legislators lose primaries

Every legislative seat is up for grabs in 2024, which means all incumbents who sought reelection had to face the voters. Most did not…
Many Democrats endorsed by reproductive rights group won primaries

Many Democrats endorsed by reproductive rights group won primaries

With nearly 53 percent of the precincts reporting as of 11 p.m. Tuesday, most of the legislative candidates endorsed by Planned Parenthood Votes New…
Abortion medication access remains after Supreme Court ruling

Abortion medication access remains after Supreme Court ruling

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled against the Texas-based Christian group trying to restrict access to abortion medication on Thursday. The case, FDA v. the…
How abortion care has changed since Dobbs 

How abortion care has changed since Dobbs 

In the month of March 2024 alone, 1,650 clinician-provided abortions took place in New Mexico, according to the reproductive research organization, the Guttmacher Institute.…
LANL plans to release highly radioactive tritium to prevent explosions. Will it just release danger in the air?

LANL plans to release highly radioactive tritium to prevent explosions. Will it just release danger in the air?

By Alicia Inez Guzmán, Searchlight New Mexico Last fall, the international community rose up in defense of the Pacific Ocean. Seafood and salt purveyors,…

GET INVOLVED

© 2023 New Mexico Political Report