The slow-motion unraveling of New Mexico’s Medicaid crackdown

There’s no getting around it. Four years after Gov. Susana Martinez’s administration charged 15 behavioral health organizations with potentially defrauding the state’s Medicaid program, its case has experienced a slow-motion unraveling. No Medicaid fraud was ever found. And those eye-popping estimates that added up to $36 million the organizations had overbilled Medicaid? In the summer of 2017, the Human Services Department (HSD) is seeking drastically lower reimbursements for overbilling the public health insurance program for low-income residents, a review of public records and state court documents has found.

Education chief pushes change in teacher evaluations

State Public Education Secretary Hanna Skandera said Monday she will push for legislation to reduce the amount of weight that student test scores play in teacher evaluations. Skandera’s announcement represents a step back — albeit a small one — from her long-running push to tie teacher effectiveness to student test scores. It received a mixed response from leaders of one state teachers’ union. Skandera said she is responding to input that the Public Education Department received during a statewide listening tour to solicit feedback on what the state can do to prepare for implementing the new federal Every Student Succeeds Act guidelines, which go into effect next summer. “We wanted to be responsive.

Eighth time’s the charm: Finally a judge, hearing date for Griego case

After a spate of recusals by judges, a district court judge finally accepted the corruption case involving a former state Senator. District Court Judge Sarah Singleton will take the case of Phil Griego, who is charged with ten counts related to corruption while he was in office. Griego resigned from the Senate last year because of a land deal. The judge set an initial hearing for April 4 at 8:15 a.m. according to nmcourts.gov.

Singleton was the eighth judge to be assigned the case; the previous seven recused themselves from the case. Since NM Political Report last wrote about the case on Thursday, two additional judges—Raymond Ortiz and Francis Mathew—recused themselves.

New Mexico AIDS Services future unknown as a new clinic is set to open

Earlier this week, a Santa Fe District Court judge denied a legal challenge against the New Mexico Department of Health in a case involving the defunding of a not-for-profit health clinic. Officials from New Mexico AIDS Services (NMAS) have said they plan to file again in a way the judge outlined. According to another AIDS and HIV clinic, all hope is not lost even if NMAS closes its doors. After District Judge Francis Mathew ruled that NMAS was “not entitled” to a restraining order to stop the defunding process, one NMAS official told the Albuquerque Journal they planned on appealing the funding determination. NMAS Board President Brian Morris told New Mexico Political Report in an email that the organization has some money saved up and plans to stay open for at least another 30 days while the legal process continues.