Senate votes to apply smoking rules to vaping

The state Senate voted 30-10 on Tuesday to restrict the use of e-cigarettes in public places much like other cigarettes, backing a proposal to curb what some public health advocates argue are the dangers of nicotine vapor from products that have gained popularity rapidly in just the last few years. But some senators argued it is premature to treat e-cigarettes like traditional tobacco products, maintaining that too little is known about the health effects of “vaping” to warrant strong restrictions. And language in the bill that could change where patrons of restaurants and bars are already allowed to smoke also raised concerns among some Republicans. Related: Senate panel: Hike cigarette tax to help schools

Sen. Cisco McSorley, D-Albuquerque, said the measure would help New Mexico keep up with changing consumer preferences. “When we did the Clean Indoor Air Act, there was no such thing as vaping,” McSorley said, arguing it is time to update the state’s main anti-smoking law.

Fed rule could snuff out e-cig industry

In the coming weeks and months the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is scheduled to exercise its right given to them by the 2009 Tobacco Control Act and regulate e-cigarette and vapor products. I applaud responsible and promotional regulation. And responsible regulation in my opinion should strive at all times to strike a balance between consumer and manufacturer. And for that reason I am writing this piece today. Jerry Apodaca served as the 24th Governor of New Mexico, from 1975-1979.

New laws go into effect today

Schools can no longer deny students access to programs because they refuse to take psychotropic medications, references to a key aspect of No Child Left Behind are gone forever in New Mexico public schools and e-cigarettes are now considered tobacco products, according to new state laws that went into effect today. June 19, 2015 marks the day when roughly half of the new legislation passed by state lawmakers in the 2015 session becomes law. In total, 79 new laws are now in place. They include a bill sponsored by state Rep. Nora Espinoza, R-Roswell, called “No Compelled Medication Use For Students.” It bars school administrators and employees from compelling “specific actions by the parent or guardian or require that a student take psychotropic medication,” according to its fiscal impact analysis.